About proxy voting

If you’re unable to vote in person on polling day, you can appoint someone to vote on your behalf at the polling station.

This is available to anyone unable to attend their polling station on polling day. It’s possible for anyone to apply for a proxy vote at a particular election, as long as they provide a reason why they’re not able to vote in person themselves on the day of the election.

You can appoint a proxy permanently, but only in certain circumstances. You may also need to get your application signed, or provide further information in order for your application to be approved.

Who you should choose

The person appointed as proxy should be someone you trust. Anyone may be appointed to act as your proxy, providing they are over 18 and eligible to vote in the same election referendum you want them to vote at on your behalf.

A person is not entitled to vote as proxy in any constituency or electoral area on behalf of more than two electors, except where they are a close relative (which is defined as being the spouse, civil partner, parent, grandparent, brother, sister, child or grandchild of the electors). There’s no limit to the number of these close relatives that a proxy may vote on behalf of.

Please note: the appointed proxy has to attend your polling station, so make sure that the person you appoint is familiar with where you would normally vote.

If the only person you trust to vote for you is unable to get to your polling station, they can apply for a postal vote.