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Frequently asked questions and responses: 1 to 83 | Adults Social Care Day Opportunities Consultation 2019 | Birmingham City Council

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Frequently asked questions and responses: 1 to 83

The following questions have been asked at different Day Opportunities consultation 2019 events and we have provided answers. This will be updated on an ongoing basis as more questions are asked at different consultation events.

Last updated 9 August 2019

1. Is there a reason why internal and external Day Services can’t work more closely together?

Birmingham City Council is committed to providing quality day services across the city and will continue to work in partnership with our providers to ensure the citizen remains at the heart of what we do. From a commissioning perspective, we want to work towards a ‘one market approach’ which would enhance much closer working between internal and external providers.

2. 1600 people use day opportunities provision in Birmingham of which 50% benefit from external provision (approx. 60 organisations). Are Birmingham City Council trying to reduce this figure?

No. Birmingham City Council seeks to ensure there are sufficient Day Opportunities available to support the needs and interests of all citizens who require and choose this support.

3. Who is going to make a decision on where people sit in the model?

As part of the three conversations model, it is proposed that a social worker would discuss what outcomes they wish to achieve with the person concerned. The level of support the person requires would be the determining factor in relation to the model.

4. People with complex needs - who do we signpost them to out in the community? This can be quite difficult.

Birmingham City Council acknowledges that information about what is available is not comprehensive. We aim to ensure there is good quality information available about what can be accessed in the community regardless of the complexity of needs.

5. Is it Birmingham City Council policy to give preference to internal providers?

No. A social care worker works with the citizen to determine the type and level of support they need. This informs the type of provision they receive.

6. Community connection how does this sit with the Specialist Intensive Support section of the model?

Community connection means different things to different people, for some it could simply be enjoying outdoor spaces and for others, it could mean being much more involved in other community activities. This means that varying levels of need and the period of intervention can vary depending on the individual circumstances and subsequently, the draft model is applicable to specialist intensive support.

7. In relation to the Proposed Day Services Model:

What does time limited mean?

This means a fixed period of time to achieve a desired outcome as agreed with the citizen

What does slightly longer mean?

This means a longer period of time to achieve a desired outcome as agreed with the citizen.

What does growing old with a learning disability mean?

Birmingham City Council acknowledges that people with learning disabilities are living longer, and as they age their needs change and this may require specific service responses.

8. Are you still doing the Quality Standards?

The application of Quality Standards for external providers sits outside of the scope of this consultation and is part of ‘business as usual’ for Birmingham City Council. At present external providers of adult day care are not regulated, therefore it is important that Birmingham City Council apply quality standards to day services across the city to ensure they are safe and help people achieve their desired outcomes.

9. How does Birmingham City Council plan to deliver the 6 key aspirations outlined in the strategy?

The focus for the consultation is to agree a set of design principles. Birmingham City Council does not wish to prejudge the result of the consultation and therefore cannot determine how the 6 key aspirations outlined in the draft Strategy might be delivered.

10. How will you ensure that social workers will implement choice in their reviews?

Birmingham City Council is implementing a new social work model, the Three Conversations Model, which very much focusses on the individual, their desires and outcomes that they want to achieve and how they want to achieve them. Exercising choice and control is a key part of that.

11. Can external providers access the community register?

Yes, the asset register is publicly available online

The Neighbourhood Network Scheme Lead Facilitators commissioned by Birmingham City Council are responsible for maintaining the directories in each Constituency, including adding to and updating the information recorded. The directory is updated bi-monthly (next edition in May), though this is currently only for Erdington, Northfield, Ladywood, Perry Barr, Selly Oak, Sutton and Yardley Constituencies (60% of the city) only. For the remaining four Constituencies, the plan is to commence from July 2019.

Further details can be found on our Social Care website.

12. How can we as an organisation get our details on the asset register?

The asset register is not necessarily relevant to all providers but it might be appropriate for some to be on it. The asset register should include all community based organisations, places and activities which are accessible to older people. Typically they might be things which have previously tended to be overlooked in Social Care (e.g. a knitting group, a film appreciation society, a gardening group etc.) as well as some very specific services we know that can support the health and wellbeing of older people.

These types of activities and services can support citizens to live healthy, happy and independent lives in their own homes and communities. It is not a list of services for people with eligible social care needs, it is more about helping people find activities, groups and networks in their local area that interest them and support their independence. For an asset to be included on the register it has to demonstrate one or more of the following outcomes:

Asset register requirements
Outcome Aim Description and examples
Social participation Increasing social participation amongst older people Provides opportunities to meet other people socially
Healthy lifestyles Encouraging and enabling healthy lifestyles Helping people become or stay physically and/or mentally active; Supporting healthy eating, meals and nutrition; Substance misuse support
Maximising income Maximising incomes Debt and benefits advice; Jobs, skills and employment
Housing Support to help older people live independently in their own homes Home improvements, maintenance and adaptations (including gardens); Support for people in their homes
Supporting carers Supporting carers Care and support specifically and explicitly for carers at home or in the community

Providers can also contact Connect to Support directly to give the details of their service so that it can be published on this directory. This might be the more appropriate option for providers to promote their service.

13. How will you ensure that social workers take into account the thoughts and knowledge of providers when it comes to clients reviews and assessments?

It is expected that social care workers would involve those contributing to the care of an individual. The person being assessed or reviewed must always remain at the centre therefore consideration should be given on how best to support the person in this process.

14. I don’t get the sense that social workers see enablement as a priority. How will enablement be implemented as a result of the Strategy?

Birmingham City Council is implementing a new social work model, the Three Conversations Model, which very much focusses on the individual, their strengths, desired outcomes and how they want to achieve them. Enablement is a key part of supporting someone to regain their independence and increase choice and control, which is a key focus for the council.

15. Could there be an opportunity for organisations like Warm Earth to be funded to employ people with a Learning Disability?

We are always open to a discussion; the employment of people with a learning disability is a priority for the Adult Social Care Directorate.

16. We have issues with carers who depend on benefits. There are concerns that if their loved ones become employed that this would negatively impact on the benefits they receive. How would Birmingham City Council mitigate against this? What would they advise?

All situations are different and Birmingham City Council would ensure that individuals have the information they need to make the right decision for them.

17. Are Birmingham City Council expecting providers to deliver all aspects of the proposed draft Day Service Model or just some?

It would be difficult to separate the model into separate delivery elements as sometimes citizens may progress through all three elements. The draft model is being consulted upon so Birmingham City Council awaits the findings to inform how it could be taken forward.

18. Will the draft model change how social workers approach assessments and review people’s needs? Particularly with assessments of people’s ability to work?

Birmingham City Council is already implementing a new social work model, the three Conversations Model, which focusses on the individual, their desires and outcomes they want to achieve and how they want to achieve them.

19. What contingencies are there if something were to happen to Ring and Ride?

The council is involved in the current discussions and the development of contingencies if required.

20. How do private providers plan for the future when we are being told that we are moving away from Day Centres?

Providers are not being told that Birmingham City Council is moving away from day centres. The aspirations of the proposed strategy include increasing choice and control as to where citizens access support and services. This is an element of the draft Strategy that Birmingham City Council is consulting on and no decision has been made.

21. Can there be a clear definition about what is meant by community connection?

Community connection is when someone feels connected with their community through the participation of different activities of their choice that are based within the community.

22. What is meant by the term “their own community”?

Community means different things to different people so it could be in their own community where they live or where they want to be.

23. Is Birmingham City Council still on target to finalise discussions around a funding framework by 1 May 2019, in line with the letter we received?

The establishment of a funding framework/pricing model is considered a ‘business as usual’ issue and is not specifically part of this consultation exercise. Birmingham City Council have been working with the external day opportunities providers on how this can best be progressed. Any specific questions or queries relating to pricing should be directed to Birmingham City Council commissioners by email at Dayopportunitiesvision@birmingham.gov.uk

24. If the strategy is implemented will there be more staff in the internal day centres to support additional activities away from the day centre?

If the draft strategy were to be implemented following consideration of results and subsequent decision by cabinet then resource requirements would be considered at that time.

25. Will internal day centres be open at the weekend / seven days a week?

At the present time, there are no plans to open at weekends. However the council regularly reviews its service to ensure it meets the needs of its citizens.

26. Will the level of safety be monitored if citizens carry out activities away from the day centre?

The health and safety of citizens supported by Birmingham City Council services will always be of paramount importance irrespective of the type of service this concerns. The appropriate safety monitoring will be in place for any activity conducted away from the day centre.

27. What is happening with the NDTi report / What is the outcome of the NDTi report?

The NDTI report has provided the council with useful insight on how day opportunities could be improved across Birmingham and would inform an action plan to improve our services for citizens. It has also helped form draft key proposals.

28. How is the council going to replicate in the new model the sense of belonging and being part of an established community of peers as found in the day centre?

The Council acknowledges how our day centres are valued and how they help maintain friendships and a sense of community. The draft strategy and proposed model focus on the individual and what is important to them. Friendship groups give a sense of wellbeing we and would want to harness that.

29. Will personal assistants be given the right level of training to support citizens?

Yes. The council would work to ensure that the right level of training and support for PAs is available.

30. Will personal assistants be qualified to administer medication?

There is no specific reference to this in any plan for council Personal Assistant provision. Any individual employed in a care role where there is a requirement to administer medication would need to be appropriately qualified or trained, irrespective of whether in the employment of the council or not.

31. Will the wages/hourly rate of PAs be increased?

The council does not set the hourly rate that personal assistants are paid. However the council does have to ensure that it is Care Act compliant and therefore the Direct Payment rate that is paid is sustainable so to enable people to arrange their own care to meet their agreed outcome.

The indicative personal budget that the council uses where someone wishes to employ a personal assistant is currently calculated on an hourly rate of £10.96. This is as stated only indicative, for example, in the event of specialist care that commands a higher rate, then the citizen with a direct payment could agree to increase the hourly rate, this would need to be evidenced as part of the support planning process.

32. How will citizens with moderate and complex needs be supported in the community?

Levels of need and the period of intervention can vary depending on the individual circumstances and, how people are supported in the community depends on the level of support they need.

33. Will the same level of care be maintained in the community if a citizen was in receipt of a direct payment rather than be supported by day care staff in a day centre?

Many of the day opportunity services provided by organisations external to the council currently support citizens with packages of care funded directly by the council, by Direct Payments and / or by self-funding arrangements. All of these groups can access the same services based on their assessed care needs or package of support required.

34. Is the draft strategy about closing day centres?

No. Birmingham City Council is currently consulting only on the proposed key aspirations of the draft strategy and the proposed day service model. Currently, there are no plans for closure of any day centre. If the draft strategy were to achieve its’ aims, we may need fewer day centres and, in future, it might be proposed to close some centres, and this would be consulted upon at that time. However, our proposals in this consultation are not about closing day centres.

35. Is BCC suggesting that the first two tiers of the proposed model take direct payment and the bottom tier remain in day centres?

No – this is not a proposal being put forward by the council.

36. How many internal day centres will remain open if the strategy is implemented?

Birmingham City Council is currently consulting only on the draft strategy and the proposed day service model. There are no current plans for closure of any day centres.

37. Will a social worker go out and view / assess private day centres to ensure they are suitable for the citizen?

The council is working to putting in place a series of quality standards for all providers of day opportunities. In addition, there would be a list of providers on our framework. For any day opportunities provider to be included on the framework they would need to demonstrate that they are of good quality and are safe. Any provider who cannot demonstrate this would not be included on the framework. The council would only refer citizens to those providers listed on the framework.

38. Can individuals at a day centre be allocated an advocate?

Birmingham City Council has recently commissioned the Birmingham Advocacy Hub

In respect of day services the Hub provides ‘Group Advocacy’ which involves bringing people with similar needs and issues together to support each other through Group Advocacy. These groups give people the opportunity to work together, share their experiences and raise joint concerns. They could potentially provide a facilitator to go into a day opportunities setting.

The Hub is also delivering a Community Advocacy Service that has less relevance to statutory requirements and is available to all citizens over the age of 18-including people living with mental health problems, learning and physical disabilities.

39. How will vulnerable citizens be supported in the community if they no longer go to a day centre?

No citizen with an assessed need for care will be denied a service appropriate to their needs.

40. Will there be more pressure put on to carers / family members if the proposed model is implemented?

No. The council values the contribution that carers make in supporting family members. That is why advice and support for carers is available through Forward Carers
Through our carers strategy, the council has committed to ensuring that carers are valued and feel supported. By law, carers are entitled to a carer’s assessment to ensure they receive the right level of support.

41. I want to learn to read at the centre and write stories

Citizens would be supported to achieve their outcomes and staff would work with the individual to make this happen. This is an example of person centred planning. The draft strategy seeks to foster more of such opportunities.

42. I enjoy gardening (planting seeds) - I used to go to the Four Seasons Gardening Centre but this was stopped, I would like to go again why was it stopped?

We would need to understand individual circumstance that led to that decision. However if a person is still interested, they can be supported by the day centre.

43. I want to know what help is available in the community to do activities, either with the help of a carer or a support worker to assist me?

I want to do more outdoor leisure activities such as swimming, or ten pin bowling. I want to feel safe can I get support to go swimming have somebody to support me in the pool?

Citizens would be supported to achieve their outcomes and staff would work with the individual to make this happen. This is an example of person centred planning. The draft strategy seeks to foster more of such opportunities. Speak to centre staff on how to achieve this and the support available.
A Direct Payment would allow you to pay for a support worker to help support you to attend activities of your choice at venues, without being dependent upon your current service to support you.

44. I need more support to do activities and develop myself to explore outdoor activities in the community.

Citizens would be supported to achieve their outcomes and staff would work with the individual to make this happen. This is an example of person centred planning. The draft strategy seeks to foster more of such opportunities. Speak to day centre staff on how else you could access woodwork if it is no longer offered at the centre.

A Direct Payment would allow you to pay for a support worker to help support you to attend activities of your choice and at venues, without being dependent upon your current service to support you.

45. If people are elderly or hard of hearing how can they give feedback - what’s in place to meet their needs?

We have produced easy read versions of the documents, and have a minicom system in place to help receive feedback. Internal day centres are conducting smaller focus group meetings to facilitate communications in methods that suit the individual. For externally run day centres, providers would ensure that communication suits the individual.

46. At Perry Trees monthly carers group the staff didn’t seem to have been briefed on the Day Opportunities consultation. The chairman said that he would not talk about the consultation why was this?

The consultation is primary aimed at citizens, and their carer advocates. Staff working at internal day centres have been briefed to help support the consultation process. All Birmingham City Council staff have been encouraged as citizens in their own right to attend the various consultation events. However as Perry Tree is a residential establishment, staff are not directly involved with the consultation, as the draft day opportunity strategy does not impact upon the current service delivered by the Perry Tree Centre.

47. The welcome centres – why don’t we give them the same power as the day centres – to report a problem to family members / carers re issues with a service users?

All providers of services are expected to be aware of safeguarding. The City Council regards safeguarding is everybody’s business. Therefore centres should inform carer/advocates if there are any issues with a service user.

48. I want to do woodwork, which I used to do at the old Bournville college. Moseley day centre had a woodwork room but it was turned into a sensory room. Can I do woodwork at Moseley again or somewhere else?>

Citizens would be supported to achieve their outcomes and staff would work with the individual to make this happen. This is an example of person centred planning. The draft strategy seeks to foster more of such opportunities. Speak to day centre staff on how else you could access woodwork if it is no longer offered at the centre.
A Direct Payment would allow you to pay for a support worker to help support you to attend activities of your choice and at venues, without being dependent upon your current service to support you.

49. We would like a more extensive and basic explanation of the proposed model (bullet points at the side) - can this be given?;

Proposed model
Enablement Personalised planning Specialist intensive support
  • We propose that when people attend day centres, we would focus on helping them to develop skills that help them to be more independent.This would be for a period of time to suit the individual.
  • We propose to focus on what people want to achieve (outcomes) and work with them to help achieve their goals.
  • We propose to work with people to access other activities in the community and not just the day centre to achieve their desired outcomes
  • We propose to focus on helping people to develop skills that help them be more independent. For some people they may need extra time to achieve their outcomes
  • Suitable for people with higher support needs
  • We propose to focus on what people want to achieve (outcomes) and work with them to help achieve their goals.
  • We propose to work with people to access other activities in the community and not just the day centre to achieve their desired outcomes
  • This would be aimed at people with more complex needs and require more specialist and intensive support.
  • The support would be on a long term basis
  • We suggest that people with complex needs should be supported to access the community just like everyone else. This would mean different things to different people.

50. >Can you give a more detailed explanation of person centred planning? – we do not understand what this means

Person Centred Planning is process for continual listening and learning, focusing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting upon this in alliance with their family and friends. It is about helping an individual work out what they want, and person-centred approaches focus on how this is delivered. Services should fit in with the needs of the individual and make changes accordingly, rather than expecting the individual to fit in with what is already there. This means looking to the wider community and not limiting resources to specialist services. Source: Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).

51. What will happen to a citizen who currently attends a day centre under the proposed model? – This person doesn’t fit in to any of the boxes in the model or the examples given during the presentation?

The draft day service model presents a set of proposed principles on how to support individuals with different support needs and levels of complexity. The council has a statutory responsibility to provide care and support for those with assessed eligible needs. Through regular review and if the individual continues to meet eligibility criteria, then services would continue to be provided. The boxes in the model are not intended to suggest that there are just 3 “types” of citizen and that all citizens are assessed as unique individuals.

52. How do I find a Social Worker to help me when I need one?

If you have care needs you can request an assessment for yourself, or someone you care for. To make referral for another person using this form: The assessment will also help you to understand what you can do for yourself and will inform you of what support is available to you in your local community and through other networks and services.

You can access a social worker by using the online referral form.

Online referral form

You can also contact social work in the following ways:

Email: acap@birmingham.gov.uk

For text relay service:

f you have a hearing impairment you can contact us by using the text relay service. Details of this service can be found on the Text Relay website.

You can call us on 0121 303 1234.

53. Do Social Workers know anything about Neighbourhood Networks?

Yes. Social workers are being introduced to the neighbourhood networks, and phase one was completed end of January 2019, and phase two is currently being rolled out. It is expected by the end of the year that all social workers will be aware of neighbourhood networks within their constituencies.

54. Will the number of social workers increase under the new proposed model/strategy?

As part of the draft day opportunities strategy and proposed model, there are no plans to increase the number of social workers.

55. Will day centres still cater for social inclusion under the new proposed model / strategy for people with severe learning disabilities and complex needs?

Day centres would continue provide a range of activities for people with severe learning disabilities and complex needs including social inclusion.

56.Do you realise how isolated a severely disabled person could become if they only get the option of a direct payment?

The council recognises that Direct Payments would not suit everyone. Care can be funded through a combination of packages of care funded directly by the council, by Direct Payments or by self-funding arrangements. Citizens would not solely offered an option of a direct payment. The best option for an individual would be discussed with their social worker

57. Why were we told 2 years ago that all day centres would be closed by 2021 and privatised?

The landscape now is different to two years ago. This consultation sets out a set of design principles and possible actions to support the improvement and proposed further development of day opportunities in Birmingham to ensure there is enough provision.

58. Why did Max Vaughan explain enablement in a different way to how it is explained in the glossary within the draft strategy?

Max Vaughan expanded on the definition of the term enablement used in the glossary contained in the Draft Day Opportunities Strategy 2019 by adding that the term can also include gaining new skills.

59. Will BCC listen to what carers have to say in relation to the draft strategy and proposed model?

All comments made will be considered and will be reflected in a consultation report which will be developed and presented to Cabinet for their decision.

60. Will there be a sufficient choice of services for a citizen with complex needs?

We acknowledge that there is a lack of sufficient choice generally and also for people with complex needs. The ambition is to develop greater choice in the future.

61. Why can’t we keep day centres as they are? What’s the chance of this?

This consultation does not involve any decision being taken about any particular day centre and that there would be separate consultation(s) in the event that anything is proposed in the future.

62. Is the whole purpose of this consultation to make all the day centres that are under used an excuse to close them?

Currently our proposals in this consultation are not about closing particular day centres; the proposals are about doing things differently to better meet the needs of people now and in future.

63. Why is there no mention of transport in the draft strategy/proposed model?

We understand transport provision is important. There are no current plans for changes of any transport provision.

64. Is there a legal document that day centre managers can use to phone service users homes like a whistle-blower? (This question was raised by one of the PFP members, carers explained that this is already in place – they gave examples of two internal day centres that would call carers / advocates if they felt there were any issues with the service user)?

This is in place within Birmingham City Council day centres. This forms part of the safeguarding procedures, all staff within Birmingham City Council is expected to be aware and have to complete training on this.

There is also a whistle blowing process.

Whistle blowing process

65. Are Care Providers to be reduced? Are the 60 providers mentioned in the presentation before or after the introduction of the new standards.

The intention is not to reduce the number of providers. There are 60 external providers currently commissioned by Birmingham City Council. Day Service provision is not currently regulated by any other body, e.g. Care Quality Commission so Birmingham City Council is introducing its own inspection process.

66. Are you still doing the Quality Standards>?

Yes - these are still going ahead and the quality assessments will begin in July 2019 for those providers who have volunteered to take part. The purpose of introducing Quality Standards is for Birmingham City Council to ensure that the day care providers it commissions are safe, delivering appropriate services and to standardise and apply the same level of quality across all providers of day care commissioned in Birmingham.

At present commissioned Providers have been invited to participate on a voluntary basis.

67. Is there not a mismatch between setting outcomes for providers) and outcomes for citizens?

The Quality Standards process will assess how providers support citizens to achieve their own outcomes that they have identified during the support planning process with their social worker.

68. Is there a day centre non-attendance policy in place?

Birmingham City Council does not currently have a policy in place that is applied to Providers of day opportunities.

69. Quality standards – how does the council have the right to assess this – is it the same way as CQC assess other services such as home care?

For any service that Birmingham City Council commissions, it has a duty to ensure that it is safe and is good quality and that those in receipt of the service are receiving the care that they require.

70. Are support workers subject to a DBS check? Are they trained to supervise vulnerable people? Are they trained to administer medication? Can they support adults having seizures? Are they reliable? (this included personal assistants)

Support workers employed by services should be DBS checked and suitably trained to look after people in their care. Implementation of Quality Standards will in part address this and check that this is the case. For Personal Assistants it is currently the employer’s responsibility to ensure that their PA is appropriately trained and DBS checked. Birmingham City Council can provide information and advice, and signpost for support with this.

71. How will you ensure that social workers will implement choice in their reviews?

In line with the Adult Social Care Vision, social work teams have embraced a new approach to assessments. This involves a move away from a traditional form of assessments to a more person centred approach of finding out exactly the support that the individual requires and how best to intervene so that the individual gets the best outcomes for them. This approach known as "Three Conversations", is centred around choice and control, and is integral to an effective review process. A new template has been introduced across all team so as to support a consistent approach and practice.

72. How will enablement be implemented as a result of the strategy?

The draft strategy supports an enablement approach, which requires staff to work with citizens in a person-centred way. This ensures that there is an enablement focus in every activity with the citizen. Through the appropriate training and development of skills, staff would develop new ways of working, which in turn would support and embed new practices that would deliver new and improved outcomes for citizens.

73. Where are the social workers?

Social workers are located within the 10 constituencies across the city. They can be contacted by telephone through our telephone access point (ACAP) on 0121 303 1234.

74. Direct Payments - many carers feel this could be a source of anxiety, needing extra time and support.

Additionally, some people mention how the personal budget can fall short due to the higher weekend rates charged by some agencies that are not being taken into account.

Many do not want direct payments/ personal budgets to be imposed upon them. These same carers are unclear about how personal budgets/direct payments work.

How could you persuade them to take up Direct Payments when they don’t know how it works?

Social Workers would have a conversation with the citizen and their carer to determine if a Direct Payment is the appropriate route for them. Information about Direct Payment can be found on the Birmingham City Council website or by contacting Client Services Finance on 0121 3031234.

75. How connected is Neighbourhood Network Scheme to day opportunities?

The Neighbourhood Networks Scheme has mapped a wide range of community based activities across the city on a constituency basis. Citizens who currently use day centres are welcome to find out if there is something in their local community that is of interest and able to provide the support that they require.

76. Will we have more day trips?

The Draft Day Opportunities Strategy which is being consulted upon proposes that people attending day opportunities services are supported into being an active part of the local community wherever possible. So if an individual wishes to do more day trips, they would need to speak to staff at their day centre to explore the idea.

77. Can I do more activities outside?

The Draft Day Opportunities Strategy which is currently being consulted upon proposes that people who wish to use day opportunities services are positively supported into community based opportunities of their choice wherever possible.

The providers of Day Opportunities would therefore be required to develop ways to help citizens to explore their aspirations and support them to do more activities outside with their service users. Also the use of a direct payments would allow people to explore and experience other activities in the community .

78. Can I learn to iron at Ebrook DC and at home?

The Draft Day Opportunities Strategy which is being consulted upon proposes that people attending day opportunities services are supported to be enabled to do everyday activities. So if an individual wishes to learn to iron, they would need to speak to staff at their relevant day centre to explore the idea.

79. Will I still be able to go to the Cinema when I go back to Ebrook?

You would need to speak to the staff at Ebrook about how you still wish to be able to go to the cinema.

80. Can I learn to use a computer?

You would need to speak to the staff at at the centre about how you wish to be able to use the computer. If they can’t run computer sessions, they may be able to support you to access a computer class elsewhere.

81. Can we have more gardening being taught at Ebrook?

You would need to speak to the staff at the centre about how you wish to be taught gardening. If they can’t run gardening sessions, they may be able to support you to access gardening hobbies elsewhere.

82. Can the service users learn life skills such as washing and cooking? It would be good if they could learn how to prepare basic food and over a few months achieve their health and hygiene certificate.

You would need to speak to the staff in the relevant centres in relation to what life skills they could offer. If that is not feasible, then service users would be supported to access life skill elsewhere and gain their certification.

83. How do I find a Social Worker to help me?

If you have care and support needs, you can request an assessment for yourself, or someone you care for by contacting our contact point by telephone on 0121 303 1234. Alternatively you can make referral for another person using our referral form.

Referral form

You can also contact social work in the following ways:

Email: acap@birmingham.gov.uk

If you have a speech impairment, are deaf or hard of hearing you can contact Birmingham City Council by Next Generation Text (also known as Text Relay and TypeTalk).

Dial 18001 before the full national phone number.

Minicom: 0121 303 1119