Birmingham City Council

Biography of Birmingham People

PLEASE NOTE

These books are not available for purchase during the move from Birmingham Central Library to the Library of Birmingham.

You can still reserve copies for loan through the online catalogue.


Struggling Manor
Inner City Birmingham in the 1920's
by Lily Need
0709301928


This is a true story of an almost forgotten era on the city's history told with great humour. Lily Need's descriptions of factory life entertained millions when presented on television's 'Secret History of Sex'. 'Struggling Manor' uses the same racy language and powerful description showing what it was like to be a machine operator who reached her 'dancing years' during the Depression.




In The Midst of Life- A History of the Burial Grounds of Birmingham
by Joseph McKenna
070930188X




Of all the histories of Birmingham this is one of the most unusual. When the great and the good have passed away this history comes into its own. It is the history of the dead and their final resting places - a ghostly tour through the eerie history of Birmingham's cemeteries.






George Thomson in Birmingham and the Blaskets
by Maggie Burns
0709302339

George Thomson was an English academic who lived for part of his life in Ireland; on the Blasket Islands, in Dublin and Galway, and became a champion of the Irish language. Later Professor of Greek at Birmingham University, he dedicated his life to the culture of working-class people. This book tells the story of his life and is illustrated with photos from Ireland, Birmingham, China and Greece.







Birmingham Women Margaret Green
075242095X

This book is a unique record of the part that women have played in the history of the city from Victorian times until the 1950s. Up until the early part of the twentieth century the primary role for women was a domestic one. Many middle-class women became involved in philanthropic social causes and the first women's anti-slavery society was established in Birmingham in 1825. The ability to contribute to war work gave working-class women an opportunity to broaden their horizons. Financial independence gradually became a possibility with increasing access to jobs in teaching, nursing, manufacturing and trade.